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01 Apr
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Rotax announces not-so secret 916iSc engine

According to the president of CubCrafters, Pat Horgan, the Carbon Cub UL has been designed for a maximum takeoff weight of 1,543 pounds (700 kilograms) and a weight of less than 882 pounds when it is empty (400 kilograms). Components made of titanium and lighter-weight prepreg composites are utilised in its construction. Horgan has not disclosed any performance requirements or specifications.

Horgan stated on the 28th of March, during an Innovation Preview presentation at the Sun ‘n Fun Aerospace Expo in Lakeland, Florida, that the aircraft and engine combination is “quiet, smooth, and powerful,” and that it also has “great fuel consumption.”
Because the engine is so quiet, you and your passenger will be able to have a natural conversation without the use of headsets, as Horgan explained. “Because of its turbocharged engine, it has been cruising at 17,500 feet and producing its maximum power rating the entire way here.”

CubCrafters has stated that the new aircraft is intended for the international market; however, a second engine option, the CubCrafters CC340 powerplant, is available for purchase by customers in the United States market.

The company is now taking deposits for the aeroplanes, and the deliveries are scheduled to begin in the year 2025.

Due to the weather, the initial engineering prototype that was supposed to be on display at Sun ‘n Fun was still on its way as of early Tuesday. The aircraft is being put through flight testing as well as additional development at this time.

The new Rotax 916 iS, which will be used to power the Carbon Cub UL, was the only thing that early visitors to the show were able to get a glimpse of because its arrival to Sun ‘n Fun was delayed. Image courtesy of David Tulis.
The new Rotax 916 iS, which will be used to power the Carbon Cub UL, was the only thing that early visitors to the show were able to get a glimpse of because its arrival to Sun ‘n Fun was delayed. Image courtesy of David Tulis.
The Rotax engine is equipped with an intelligent engine control system and can operate on either avgas or automotive fuel. According to Marc Becker, head of the Rotax aviation engine division, it has a power-to-weight ratio of 160 horsepower at 189 pounds, a time between overhauls (TBO) of 2,000 hours, and “will fit into existing 915 iS installations.”

According to Becker, the engine is essentially the same as a 915 iS, but it features “recalibrated software” and has been upgraded with a stronger crankshaft, gear box, and other components.

He explained that this would allow for increased performance without compromising the system’s dependability.

The 916 iS can be purchased at retail for $49,000, which includes a warranty good for five years. The engine is also eligible for an extended warranty through a programme called Rotax Care, which covers the engine for a period of five years or until it reaches its TBO.

The first installation of the engine is in the Carbon Cub UL, but it won’t be available until June. In the United States, it won’t be available until August.